Latin Abbreviations


Abbreviation

Latin

Translation

AD

anno Domini

"in the year of the Lord"[1]

a.i.

ad interim

"temporarily"

A.M.

Ante Meridiem

"before midday"[1]

c., ca., ca orcca.

circa

"around", "about", "approximately"[2][3]

Cap.

capitulus

"chapter"

cf.

confer

"bring together" and hence "compare"

cp.


compare

Cp

ceteris paribus

"all other things being equal"

C.V. or CV

curriculum vitae

"course of life"

cwt.

centum weight

"Hundredweight"[1]

D.V.

Deo volente

"God willing"

DG, D.G. or DEI GRA

Dei gratia

"by the grace of God".[1]

ead.

eadem

see id. below.

et al.

et alii

"and others", "and co-workers".[1]

etc.

et cetera

"and the others", "and other things", "and the rest".[1]

e.g.

exempli gratia

"for example", "for instance".[1]

fl.

floruit

"he/she flourished" or "he/she was in his/her prime", followed by the dates during which the person, usually famous, was active and productive in his profession, as opposed to the person's dates of birth and death. This is usually seen as parenthetical information.

f. (singular)

ff. (plural)

folio/foliis

"and following"

ibid.

ibidem

"in the same place (book, etc.)"[1]

id.

idem

"the same (man)".[1]

i.a.

inter alia

"among other things".

i.e.

id est

"that is", "in other words".[1]

J.D.

Juris Doctor

"doctor of law".

lb.

libra

"scales"

LL.B.

Legum Baccalaureus

"bachelor of laws"

M.A.

Magister Artium

"Master of Arts"

M.O.

modus operandi

"method of operating"

N.B.

nota bene

"note well"

nem. con.

nemine contradicente

"with no one speaking against"

op. cit.

opere citato

"the work cited"

p.a.

per annum

"through a year"

per cent.

per centum

"for each one hundred"

Ph.D.

Philosophiæ Doctor

"Doctor of Philosophy"

P.M.

Post Meridiem

"after midday"

p.m.a.

post mortem auctoris

"after the author's death"

p.p. and per pro.

per procurationem

"through the agency of"

PRN

pro re nata

"as needed"

pro tem.

pro tempore

"for the time being", "temporarily", "in place of"

P.S.

post scriptum

"after what has been written"

Q.D.

quaque die

"every day"

Q.E.D.

quod erat demonstrandum

"which was to be demonstrated".[1]

q.v.

quod videre

"which to see"

Re

in re

"in the matter of", "concerning"

REG

regina

"queen"

r.

regnavit

"he/she reigned"

R.I.P.

requiescat in pace

"may he/she rest in peace"

s.o.s.

si opus sit

"if there is need", "if occasion require", "if necessary"[8]

Sic.

sic. or sic erat scriptum

"Thus it was written"

stat.

statim

"immediately"

viz.

videlicet

"namely", "to wit", "precisely", "that is to say"[1]

vs. or v.

versus

"against"


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